The Help (2011)

Set in Mississippi during the 1960s, Skeeter (Stone) is a southern society girl who returns from college determined to become a writer, but turns her friends’ lives — and a Mississippi town — upside down when she decides to interview the black women who have spent their lives taking care of prominent southern families. Aibileen (Davis), Skeeter’s best friend’s housekeeper, is the first to open up — to the dismay of her friends in the tight-knit black community. Despite Skeeter’s life-long friendships hanging in the balance, she and Aibileen continue their collaboration and soon more women come forward to tell their stories — and as it turns out, they have a lot to say. Along the way, unlikely friendships are forged and a new sisterhood emerges, but not before everyone in town has a thing or two to say themselves when they become unwittingly — and unwillingly — caught up in the changing times.

Review source: Imdb.com

I’m going to buy the book because I really love this film and I’ve matched it many times. I recommend that you do the same.

Advertisements

Woman Leaning over Banister

House No˚1

This image might not make much sense, but it is accompanied by a letter (which is quite personal for me to put on the internet yet). It is from to my grandmother to my great grandmother. The letter is addressed to this house that my grandmother no longer lives in. I was so glad that it hadn’t been knocked down because  I went to another house that had been replaced, which was quite upsetting. This image is to do with history of the art and recreating it.

Poem: If We Must Die – Claude Mckay

If we must die—let it not be like hogs
Hunted and penned in an inglorious spot,
While round us bark the mad and hungry dogs,
Making their mock at our accursed lot.
If we must die—oh, let us nobly die,
So that our precious blood may not be shed
In vain; then even the monsters we defy
Shall be constrained to honor us though dead!
Oh, Kinsmen! We must meet the common foe!
Though far outnumbered, let us show us brave,
And for their thousand blows deal one deathblow!
What though before us lies the open grave?
Like men we’ll face the murderous, cowardly pack,
Pressed to the wall, dying, but fighting back!

Poem by Claude Mckay, from the book “Poetry of the Negro 1746-1970″ edited by Langson Huges and Arna Bontemps

Poem: To Vanity – Darwin T. Turner

Doll, don’t be too proud of those eyes
Sparkling in their mascaraed skies;
Don’t be too vain that you now see
All hearts your captives; your still free;
And stop shaking that lustrous hair
And shedding dandruff on the air.
‘Cause that buck-nineteen rhinestone, dear,
That glitters from your pearlshell ear,
Will still be thought a pretty gem
When all your world of beauty’s dim.

Poem by Darwin T. Turner, from the book “Poetry of the Negro 1746-1970″ edited by Langson Huges and Arna Bontemps

Bayeté Ross Smith- Our Kind of People

I love this work about stereotyping.

[Images from Bayeterosssmith.com]


Artist – Reneé Cox

There are so much images of Reneé Cox that I would love to show because I find them all great, but these are a few that I have picked out to share.

[Images from Reneecox.org]

 

Poem: I’ve Got A Home In That Rock – Raymond R. Patterson

I had an uncle, once, who kept a rock in his pocket–
Always did, up to the day he died.
And as far as I know, that rock is still with him,
Holding down some dust of his thighbone.

From Mississippi he’d got that rock, he’d say—
Or, sometimes, from Tennessee: a different place each time
He told it, how he’d picked it up when he first left home—
Running, he’d say—to remind him when times got hard
Enough to make him homesick, what home was really like.

Poem by Raymond R. Patterson, from the book “Poetry of the Negro 1746-1970” edited by Langson Huges and Arna Bontemps

Laughing in the kitchen collage

I’ve been away for quite a while, but I’m back and and producing work again.

New Image: 60s-70s Portrait?

New Image: 70s Portrait

Chino Otsuka – Finding Me and Michael Jackson Pepsi Ad 1992

I love Chino Otsuka’s “Finding me” project. I think what I particularly like about it is the older self visiting the younger self and visa versa. She has used old holiday photographs and has edited them very well that you would believe her older self was originally in the photos. But without the dates under the image, I think that a lot of people would have thought it was another woman in the photograph.

1976 and 2005, Kamakura, Japan

1982 ans 2005, Paris, France

[Images from chino.co.uk]

These photographs remind me of Michael Jackson’s Pepsi commercial, which is on the Dangerous DVD. It’s such a lovely piece as the older Michael sings the song “I’ll be there” then the younger Michael joins him and they sing together.

Watch the video below, it is so beautiful.

Tracey Rose

Latoya Ruby Frazier

I couldn’t believe when I was reading an interview with Frazier, what she said;

Talking about your family photographs, you said, “My grandmother indicates the past, and my mother indicates the present.”

The project is about a continuation of personal history, family history, and communal history. We’re coming out of the same geographic location. We span the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. We have a particular way of carrying ourselves and the way that we think has been transmitted through the generations, from my grandmother to my mother to me.

When did your family move to the area? How far back was it?

I have collected all of the information that my mother and grandmother were willing to give, but there is a lot I don’t know. The reason I obsess over photographing all of us is that I don’t have a family history. We didn’t have a family photo album. We didn’t talk about the past. My mother had difficult times, and maybe to protect me she just didn’t want to discuss it.

[Full article can be found at huffingtonpost.com]

That is the main reason for my own personal work, I too don’t have a family history. My history ends with my Grandmother.

Check out her website at latoyarubyfrazier.com

Sitting on bedroom floor collage

%d bloggers like this: